Dr. Woodruff was a featured trainer in our June 24th, 2009  Environmental Health Ambassador training, “Exploring the Links Between Reproductive Health and Chemicals.” Read more about the training.

Environmental health scientist Tracey Woodruff, PhD, MPH, is an expert on the impact of chemicals on reproductive health in both men and women. Her research focuses on environmental health issues, including health effects from air pollution, children’s health risks, and science policy issues.

She is the director of the Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment (PRHE), which is housed within UCSF’s National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health, and is an associate professor in residence in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at UCSF. The mission of the PRHE is to advance scientific inquiry, professional training, public education and health policies that reduce the impacts of environmental contaminants on reproductive and developmental health. PRHE is a unique program designed to pioneer a transdisciplinary model in environmental reproductive health that integrates, translational and health policy research with education, health care and health policy.

Woodruff came to PRHE from the Office of Policy, Economics and Innovation in the federal Environmental Protection Agency, where she was a senior scientist, policy adviser and epidemiological expert on particulate matter and ozone standards. She also co-led the project producing the first national characterization of air toxics across the US. She has brought considerable scientific and policy experience on the implications of exposure to environmental contaminants and the effects on child health and development. Woodruff has worked on a number of high-profile environmental health issues, including air pollution, children’s health, interpreting biomonitoring data and cancer policy.

She recently co-led an international workshop on air pollution and its effects on perinatal health at the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology meeting in Mexico City. The workshop was attended by leading experts from around the world, where participants identified key research priorities and the next steps toward developing an international, collaborative effort to advance research in this field. In addition, she helped lead the UCSF-Collaborative on Health and the Environment Summit on Environmental Challenges to Reproductive Health and Fertility in January 2007 at the UCSF Mission Bay campus.

Woodruff has published articles in Environmental Health Perspectives, Toxicology and Industrial Health, Environmental Research, and other journals. Some of her work focuses on environmental health indicators for children and measures to track children’s environmental health. This led to two reports, the second, “America’s Children and the Environment: Measures of Contaminants, Body Burdens, and Illnesses” was released in spring of 2003. She received her Ph.D. and M.P.H. in the environmental health sciences from the University of California, Berkeley and completed a Pew Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco, Institute for Health Policy Studies.