The Healthy Schools Bill of 2003 (AB
1006, Judy Chu) would eliminate the
worst pesticides from use in schools,
including those known to cause developmental
damage and cancer. Since children
and teachers spend as many as eight hours
a day in classrooms, PSR-LA believes this
bill is crucial to achieving a safe, nontoxic
learning environment.
Pesticides are known to cause acute
symptoms such as nausea, headache,
dizziness, asthma attacks, and respiratory
irritation. Birth defects, nervous system
disorders, reproductive problems, learning
disabilities, immune deficiency, and
several types of cancer have repeatedly
been linked to pesticide exposure. A 2002
survey of California’s 15 largest school
districts found 54 pesticide ingredients
that are known or suspected carcinogens,
reproductive or developmental toxins,
endocrine disruptors, acute toxins and/or
cholinesterase inhibitors (nervous system
toxicants) may still be in use.
Children’s bodies and brains are still
developing and growing. Exposure to pesticides
during periods of development may
have permanent, irreversible effects.
In addition, female teachers are showing
sharply higher cancer rates. A recent
study by the University of Southern
California, UC Irvine, and the California
Department of Health Services shows that
female teachers, compared to other
women of the same age and race in
California, have a:
􀁑 51 percent higher rate of breast cancer
􀁑 47 percent higher rate of lymphoma
􀁑 28 percent higher rate of leukemia
While these illnesses are likely not
caused by pesticide use alone, they make a
strong argument for precautionary action.
Reducing in-classroom use of pesticides
A First Look: The Environmental Health
Policy Agenda for 2003
associated with cancer and developmental
problems is an intelligent first step.
Many school districts are already
moving towards effective, efficient, and
cost-competitive non-toxic pest control,
including Los Angeles Unified, Ventura
Unified, and Santa Ana Unified. Safer
approaches can save money by reducing
health care costs for students and staff,
school absenteeism, and lost staff productivity.
Non-toxic methods can reduce
the actual costs of pest management
through better maintenance and the use
of safe alternatives.
Please contact Assemblymember Judy
Chu to support the Healthy Schools Act
of 2003:
The Honorable Judy Chu
State Capitol, P.O. Box 942849
Sacramento, CA 94249-0049
(916) 319-2049

The Healthy Schools Bill of 2003 (AB 1006, Judy Chu) would eliminate the worst pesticides from use in schools, including those known to cause developmental damage and cancer. Since children and teachers spend as many as eight hours a day in classrooms, PSR-LA believes this bill is crucial to achieving a safe, nontoxic learning environment.

Pesticides are known to cause acute symptoms such as nausea, headache, dizziness, asthma attacks, and respiratory irritation. Birth defects, nervous system disorders, reproductive problems, learning disabilities, immune deficiency, and several types of cancer have repeatedly been linked to pesticide exposure. A 2002 survey of California’s 15 largest school districts found 54 pesticide ingredients that are known or suspected carcinogens, reproductive or developmental toxins, endocrine disruptors, acute toxins and/or cholinesterase inhibitors (nervous system toxicants) may still be in use.

Children’s bodies and brains are still developing and growing. Exposure to pesticides during periods of development may have permanent, irreversible effects.

In addition, female teachers are showing sharply higher cancer rates. A recent study by the University of Southern California, UC Irvine, and the California Department of Health Services shows that female teachers, compared to other women of the same age and race in California, have a:

􀁑 51 percent higher rate of breast cancer

􀁑 47 percent higher rate of lymphoma

􀁑 28 percent higher rate of leukemia

While these illnesses are likely not caused by pesticide use alone, they make a strong argument for precautionary action. Reducing in-classroom use of pesticides associated with cancer and developmental problems is an intelligent first step.

Many school districts are already moving towards effective, efficient, and cost-competitive non-toxic pest control, including Los Angeles Unified, Ventura Unified, and Santa Ana Unified. Safer approaches can save money by reducing health care costs for students and staff, school absenteeism, and lost staff productivity. Non-toxic methods can reduce the actual costs of pest management through better maintenance and the use of safe alternatives.

Please contact Assemblymember Judy Chu to support the Healthy Schools Act of 2003: The Honorable Judy Chu State Capitol, P.O. Box 942849 Sacramento, CA 94249-0049  (916) 319-2049