UCLA Faculty Center
Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 6:30 PM
$25 dinner/$30 with dessert
RSVP to bennettramberg@aol.com by July 20, 11am

Over the past several weeks North Korea test-fired a multistage rocket, detonated a nuclear device, fired short- and medium-range missiles, sentenced a pair of American journalists to 12 years of hard labor for alleged “hostile acts,” and threatened a nuclear attack against Hawaii, all despite strong condemnation from the international community. What is motivating this latest round of North Korean provocations? What challenges do the United States and its regional partners face in deterring North Korean actions? What does RAND analysis – based on interviews with North Korean defectors and others with access to the long-secluded country’s on-the-ground reality–tell us about the current state of North Korea’s economy, internal politics, and relations with other countries and about the stability of the regime?

Chibong Hahm is a senior political scientist who specializes in Korean and East Asian politics and security issues. Prior to joining RAND in 2007, he was a professor in the School of International Relations and the Department of Political Science as well as the director of Korean Studies Institute at the University of Southern California. From 1992 to 2005, he was a professor in the Department of Political Science at Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea. From 2003 to 2005, he served as the director of the Division of Social Sciences Research and Policy at UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) in Paris, France. He has been a visiting professor at Duke, Georgetown, and Princeton universities and was a visiting fellow at the International Forum for Democratic Studies in Washington, D.C. Hahm earned his Ph.D. in political science from Johns Hopkins University.: Chibong Hahm is a senior political scientist who specializes in Korean and East Asian politics and security issues. Prior to joining RAND in 2007, he was a professor in the School of International Relations and the Department of Political Science as well as the director of Korean Studies Institute at the University of Southern California.

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